References

Below is a collection of standards, guidelines and policies that inform the development of VHA technology products.  The scope of items included range from international guidelines to VHA specific standards and policies. This is a preliminary list which will be updated over time. If you have items to add, please contact us.

Standards

ISO 9241-210:2009 provides requirements and recommendations for HCD principles and activities throughout the life cycle of interactive systems; it is for use by those responsible for planning and managing projects that develop interactive systems. It addresses technical human factors and ergonomics issues to the extent necessary to enable understanding of their relevance and importance in the design process as a whole.

ISO 26800:2011 presents the general ergonomics approach and specifies basic ergonomics principles and concepts. These are applicable to the design and evaluation of tasks, jobs, products, tools, equipment, systems, organizations, services, facilities and environments, in order to make them compatible with the characteristics, the needs and values, and the abilities and limitations of people.

The provisions and guidance given by ISO 26800:2011 are intended to improve the safety, performance, effectiveness, efficiency, reliability, availability and maintainability of the design outcome throughout its life cycle, while safeguarding and enhancing the health, well-being and satisfaction of those involved or affected.

The intended users of ISO 26800:2011 are designers, ergonomists and project managers, as well as managers, workers, consumers (or their representatives) and procurers. It also serves as a reference standard for standards developers dealing with ergonomics aspects.

ISO 9241-11:2018 provides a framework for understanding the concept of usability and applying it to situations where people use interactive systems, and other types of systems (including built environments), and products (including industrial and consumer products) and services (including technical and personal services).
ISO 9241-11:2018 provides a framework for understanding the concept of usability and applying it to situations where people use interactive systems, and other types of systems (including built environments), and products (including industrial and consumer products) and services (including technical and personal services).
Provides a path for the most efficient design of furniture, clothing, tools, or anything that must be used safely, comfortably, and efficiently by taking into account the dimensions of the human body. Anthropometry provides the human dimensional data, and the techniques to properly apply these data may vary in proportion to the complexity of the population to be accommodated.

This study establishes a foundation of EHR user interface design considerations and
proposes an action agenda for the application of information design principles to the use of
health information technology (health IT) in primary care settings.

ISO/IEC TR 25060:2010: Systems and software engineering — Systems and software product Quality Requirements and Evaluation (SQuaRE) — Common Industry Format (CIF) for usability: General framework for usability-related information

ISO/IEC 25064:2013: Systems and software engineering — Software product Quality Requirements and Evaluation (SQuaRE) — Common Industry Format (CIF) for usability: User needs report

ISO/IEC 25064:2013: Systems and software engineering — Software product Quality Requirements and Evaluation (SQuaRE) — Common Industry Format (CIF) for usability: User needs report

Guidance

The Center for Research and Innovation in Systems Safety (CRISS) places an emphasis on the effects of the introduction of new technologies on clinical care and the use of electronically generated clinical data to identify evolving events and support decision-making.

A toolkit with strategies, resources and case studies to help mitigate EHR usability issues while optimizing the use of health IT. Intended for Health IT implementers to improve the usability of EHRs across healthcare IT systems including hospitals, ambulatory, and small practices.

California HealthCare Foundation, SHARPC, Electronic Health Record Association (EHRA) Clinician Experience Workgroup. The team, based at the University of Missouri-Columbia, Involution Studios Boston, University of Maryland Human-Computer Interaction Lab, The University of Texas Health Sciences Center-Houston.

EHRs will provide “Patient-Centered Cognitive Support” when they are specifically designed and optimized to support problem solving and decision making that maximizes the chance of providing the highest quality of care for patients, as measured by IOM’s six dimensions of quality (safe, effective, timely, efficient, equitable, and patient-centered.)

EHR is generating benefits for care providers and patients, usability, workflow, and cognitive support problems have surfaced.

The U.S. Web Design System open source community of government engineers, content specialists, and designers. To build fast, accessible, mobile-friendly government websites.

User experience (UX) focuses on having a deep understanding of users, what they need, what they value, their abilities, and also their limitations. It also takes into account the business goals and objectives of the group managing the project.

Policy

Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 provides guidance to Federal agency staff who play a role in IT accessibility.

The official guidelines for the Plain Writing Act of 2010. These guidelines to help you and your agency write clearly so your users can find: what they need, understand what they find, and use what they find to meet their needs.